Expedition Log

04.24.19

Seafloor Ecology Expedition 2019 – Log 4

Postdoctoral Fellow Amanda Kahn Studying the connection deep-sea sponges create between microbes in the water column and seafloor communities. Deep-sea animals have so many different adaptations to find food because food is scarce in deep water.  Deep-sea sponges are common at Sur Ridge and grow to over a meter (3.3 feet) tall!  Sponges are filter …

Expedition Log

04.22.19

Seafloor Ecology Expedition 2019 – Log 3

Octopus Garden When MBARI and MBNMS researchers were onboard the E/V Nautilus last year they had the opportunity to check out a spot near Davidson Seamount.  They found something so surprising and intriguing that we revisited the same site on this expedition. On the seafloor, in cracks and crevices on the edge of this underwater …

Expedition Log

04.21.19

Seafloor Ecology Expedition 2019 – Log 2

Deep-sea coral observatory Along with the sanctuary and other collaborators, studies of deep-sea coral and sponge communities at Sur Ridge are becoming a focal area for collaborative deep-sea research around Monterey Bay.  As one element of this partnership, MBARI is initiating a “Deep-Sea Coral Observatory” to help understand various processes that influence the biodiversity, productivity, …

Expedition Log

04.20.19

Seafloor Ecology Expedition 2019 – Log 1

Deep-sea coral discovery Unlike shallow water coral reefs that are accessible in most tropical reef areas, deep-sea corals are typically remote and inaccessible due to their great depth, often hundreds to thousands of meters beneath the surface, as well as far from shore. So, even though deep-sea coral ecosystems occur in deep rocky habitats across …

Expedition Log

04.19.19

Seafloor Ecology Expedition 2019

MBARI Expedition #462 Expedition goal: Our cruise off the central California coast has several objectives related to three research themes in deep-sea ecology: 1) study the sponge and coral communities at Sur Ridge, 2) revisit a corn stover sunk to 3,200 meters depth in 2009 and sample the colonizing communities, and 3) begin a wood-fall experiment …