Ocean health

One of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s long-term goals is to restore the health and productivity of the world ocean, on which all life depends. MBARI research results have contributed to raising public awareness about the health and future of the ocean.

An urgent message for ocean conservation

To exemplify the urgent need for ocean conservation Chris Scholin, president and chief executive officer of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Juile Packard, executive director of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, wrote an opinion article that was published in the New York Times.

While pointing out serious threats to the ocean such as pollution, overfishing, climate change, and “the rush to exploit the riches of the ocean and seafloor,” Scholin and Packard also expressed that,“We need a global initiative to accelerate our understanding of the deep sea and how it is faring. A cooperative, multicountry monitoring network to track and report threats (…) could provide critical guidance for climate policy and sustainable ocean management.”

“The ocean is the largest home for life on our planet and the blue heart of earth’s climate system. We must use them wisely. Otherwise, we risk using them up.”

Read the full column

Related

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Testing how ocean change affects abalone

July 16, 2018 – A team of MBARI scientists is monitoring abalones under carefully controlled environmental conditions for two months to learn more about how these animals will fare in future ocean conditions.
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Making the case for ocean conservation

June 8, 2018 – Bringing to light an urgent message of ocean conservation to the public, leaders of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Monterey Bay Aquarium wrote a column that was published in the New York Times today.

Ocean Health Projects

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Studying the biological pump

May 17-19, 2018 – During a recent research cruise MBARI's Marine Microbial Ecology Group and their colleagues retrieved experiments from the seafloor to learn about carbon cycling in the deep sea.
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Pelagic-Benthic Coupling 2018 Expedition

April 18-25, 2018
MBARI's Pelagic-Benthic Coupling Group, led by Chief Scientist Ken Smith, return to their study site at Station M, located 200 kilometers off the coast of Santa Barbara, California, to understand how the supply of carbon affects deep-sea communities on the seafloor.
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M1 mooring turnaround

Apr 5, 2017 - MBARI’s M1 mooring is an important data collection station that floats above the seafloor in Monterey Bay continuously taking a variety of measurements to give researchers a clear picture of oceanographic conditions.

Making an impact

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Ocean health

One of the David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s long-term goals it to restore the health and productivity of the world ocean, on which all live depends. MBARI research results have contributed to raising public awareness about the health and future of the ocean.
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Exploration and discovery

Exploration inevitably leads to discovery. MBARI is uniquely positioned to explore the deep-sea realm and its connections with the ocean surface. Easy access to Monterey Bay’s deep submarine canyon provides a natural laboratory for scientific research and engineering innovation.
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Climate change

Climate-driven changes in upwelling, ocean mixing, oxygen minimum zones, and nutrient cycling are likely to affect the year-to-year variation in ocean ecosystem processes. These changes will potentially impact marine life and the fundamental underpinnings of fisheries from shallow to deep-sea habitats.