Time-lapse camera mooring

The time-lapse camera system was first deployed at Station M in 1989 (Smith et al., 1993), and has since been collecting time-lapse image data sets of approximately four months each. The camera takes one still photograph of the seafloor every hour and the film is recovered and the equipment redeployed during maintenance cruises 3 times a year. The time-lapse camera consists of a Benthos 377 camera mounted on a titanium frame at an angle of 31º from horizontal with the lens ~2 m above the sea floor. The camera is equipped with a 28-mm Nikonos lens, providing angular coverage of 50º in the horizontal and 35º in the vertical plane, and holds 400 feet of 35-mm color-negative film (Fuji, Type 8514, 500 ASA). Up to 3500 images can be collected in 4.6 months. Two 400-W-s strobes, one mounted on either side of the camera housing, illuminate approximately 20 m2 of the sea floor beginning at a distance of 1.8 m from the camera frame and extending approximately 6.5 m from the base of the camera frame (see Smith et al. 1993 for a more complete description of the time-lapse camera). In June 2007 a high-resolution digital camera was added to the frame. The camera is housed with a PC104 processor and external memory drive. These components are used to control the camera and store images. Additionally, in the same housing are a low power controller (Persistor CF2) and an electronic interface board to control power to the PC104 stack, camera, and strobes.

Team

Kevin Gomes

Information Engineering Group Lead

Technology

Solving challenges
Taking the laboratory into the ocean
Environmental Sample Processor (ESP)
In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer
Midwater Respirometer System
Mobile flow cytometer
Enabling targeted sampling
Automated Video Event Detection
Environmental Sample Processor (ESP)
Gulper autonomous underwater vehicle
Mobile flow cytometer
Wave Glider-based communications hotspot
Advancing a persistent presence
Aerostat hotspot
Benthic event detectors
Benthic rover
Fault Prognostication
Long-range autonomous underwater vehicle Tethys
MARS hydrophone for passive acoustic monitoring
Monterey Ocean-Bottom Broadband Seismometer
Shark Café camera
Vehicle Persistence
Wave Glider-based communications hotspot
Emerging and current tools
Communications
Aerostat hotspot
Wave Glider-based communications hotspot
Data management
Oceanographic Decision Support System
Spatial Temporal Oceanographic Query System (STOQS) Data
Video Annotation and Reference System
Instruments
Apex profiling floats
Benthic event detectors
Deep particle image velocimetry
Environmental Sample Processor (ESP)
Persistent presence—2G ESP
How does the 2G ESP work?
Arrays on the 2G ESP
Printing probe arrays
Expeditions and deployments
In Situ Ultraviolet Spectrophotometer
Investigations of imaging for midwater autonomous platforms
Lagrangian sediment traps
Midwater Respirometer System
Mobile flow cytometer
SeeStar Imaging System
Shark Café camera
Smart underwater connector
Power
Wave-Power Buoy
Vehicle technology
Benthic Rover
Gulper autonomous underwater vehicle
Imaging autonomous underwater vehicle
Seafloor mapping AUV
Long-range autonomous underwater vehicle Tethys
Mini remotely operated vehicle
ROV Doc Ricketts
ROV Ventana
Video
Automated Video Event Detection
Deep learning
Video Annotation and Reference System
Technology publications
Technology transfer
Publications