Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Press Room
11 May 2011

Images related to the MBARI News Release
Antarctic icebergs help the ocean take up carbon dioxide

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from MBARI. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should contact Kim Fulton-Bennett, kfb@mbari.org, 831-775-1835.

Small iceberg in the Weddell Sea

Ken Smith and researchers from over a dozen institutions spent three month-long cruises in a part of the Weddell Sea that they dubbed "iceberg alley."
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


Small, eroding iceberg in the Weddell Sea

Icebergs such as this one carry iron-rich sediment from Antarctica out into the Southern Ocean. The darker parts of the ice contain higher concentrations of sediment.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


shadow of research vessel on iceberg

During the research team's 2009 cruise, the low Arctic sun cast the shadow of the research vessel Nathanial Palmer on the side of this large tabular iceberg.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


View off stern of ship toward iceberg

Instead of avoiding icebergs, the research vessel Nathanial Palmer approached very closely to these floating "islands" of ice during this five-year research project.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


Recovering a Lagrangian sediment trap using a small boat

Researchers programmed this Lagrangian sediment trap (the gray tube with white funnels) to sink 600 meters below the surface as a large iceberg drifted overhead. After collecting sinking debris for about three days, the trap rose to the surface. At that point, researchers and crew members used a small boat to lift the trap carefully out of the water and then hoisted it onto their research vessel.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


Recovering a Lagrangian sediment trap using a small boat

Researchers programmed this Lagrangian sediment trap (the gray tube with white funnels) to sink 600 meters below the surface as a large iceberg drifted overhead. After collecting sinking debris for about three days, the trap rose to the surface. At that point, researchers and crew members used a small boat to lift the trap carefully out of the water and then hoisted it onto their research vessel.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


Lagrangian sediment trap and researchers

Ken Smith (left), Alana Sherman (right), and other members of the research team examine a Lagrangian sediment trap after it was brought back on board the research vessel.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


ROV and iceberg

This small remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was customized to collect video and water samples underneath Antarctic icebergs.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


Launching ROV near iceberg

Researchers launch a small remotely operated vehicle (ROV) that was customized to collect video and water samples underneath Antarctic icebergs.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI


Remotely controlled plane taking off from the deck of the research vessel Nathanial Palmer

Researchers launched this remotely controlled plane from the deck of the research vessel Nathanial Palmer to collect video of icebergs and drop GPS tracking devices on top of icebergs.
Image: Debbie Nail Meyer © 2009 MBARI

Last updated: May. 11, 2011