Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Press Room
2 November 2009

Images related to the MBARI News Release
Deep-sea ecosystems affected by climate change

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from MBARI or from the photographers. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should contact Kim Fulton-Bennett, kfb@mbari.org, 831-775-1835.

Crinoid at Station M
Image credit: © 2007 MBARI

This stalked crinoid (a distant relative of sea urchins) was photographed on the deep seafloor at "Station M," about 4,000 meters below the surface and 220 kilometers west of Point Conception on the California Coast.



Image credit: © 2007 MBARI

A deep-sea urchin crawls across the muddy seafloor at Station M, about 220 kilometers off the California coast and 4,000 meters below the sea surface. After studying these and other deep-sea animals, Ken Smith's research group has seen their populations change dramatically from one year to another. This photograph was taken using an underwater camera whose time-lapse photographs show changes in the number and types of animals on the deep seafloor (see video below).



Image credit: Kris Walz © 2007 MBARI

This photomontage (not to scale) shows some of the deep-sea animals that live in the seafloor sediment at "Station M," about 4,000 meters below the surface and 220 kilometers west of Point Conception on the California Coast. Starting in the upper left corner and proceeding clockwise, these animals include a clam, an ostracod, a polychaete worm, a brittle star, a cumacean, a tanaid, and a snail. In the center is a brachiopod.



Image credit: © 2007 MBARI

A small grenadier fish swims over the seafloor at Station M. Between 1989 and 2004, the number of grenadier at Station M doubled. This photograph was taken using an underwater camera whose time-lapse photographs show changes in the number and types of animals on the deep seafloor (see video below).



Image credit: © 2007 MBARI

A small grenadier fish swims over the seafloor at Station M. Between 1989 and 2004, the number of grenadier at Station M doubled. This photograph was taken using an underwater camera whose time-lapse photographs show changes in the number and types of animals on the deep seafloor (see video below).



Image credit: Base map courtesy of NOAA (ETOPO1 Global Relief Model)

This map shows the locations of the long-term, deep-sea study sites at Station M and the Porcupine Abyssal Plain.


Time-lapse video of deep-sea animals
This video shows a series of time-lapse still images of animals on the deep seafllor. The images were taken at one-hour intervals over a period of about three months in spring 2007. About one minute into the video, you can see a dramatic increase in the amount of organic material (food for deep-sea animals) landing on the seafloor. These images were taken at "Station M," a long-term research site about 4,000 meters below the surface and 220 kilometers west of Point Conception, on the Central California Coast. MBARI marine ecologist Ken Smith has been conducting research at Station M since about 1990.


Last updated: Nov. 02, 2009