Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Press Room
10 July 2006

Images related to the news release
Midgets and giants in the deep sea

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from the copyright holders. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should contact Kim Fulton-Bennett, kfb@mbari.org, 831-775-1835.


Image credit: (c) 2006 Craig McClain

This photograph shows three medium-sized shallow-water snails, along with three tiny deep-sea snails (at upper left).


Image credit: (c) 2006 Craig McClain

This photograph shows a tiny deep-sea snail compared with a US quarter.


Image credit: (c) 2002 NOAA

This giant deep-sea isopod is an example of an animal that has evolved to a much larger size in deeper water. These isopods are distant relatives of the tiny "pill bugs" found in many gardens. They are also related to small shallow-water isopods that live in tide pools.
(Original NOAA image here).


Image credit: (c) 2006 MBARI

This drawing illustrates how large animals, such as elephants, may become smaller after being isolated on islands, whereas relatively small animals, such as shrews, sometimes evolve into larger species.


Image credit: (c) 2006 MBARI

This drawing illustrates how the "island rule" applies to deep-sea snails. Large shallow-water snails tend to evolve into smaller species in deep water, while tiny snails often grow larger.

Last updated: Apr. 21, 2009