Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Press Room
05 Jan 2006

Images related to the news release
Tiny marine organisms reflect ocean warming

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from MBARI. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should contact Kim Fulton-Bennett, kfb@mbari.org, 831-775-1835.


Image credit: (c) 2002 David Field

Foraminifera (forams) are small, amoeba-like organisms that live inside shells ("tests") such as the one shown above. This foram was collected from the waters overlying the Santa Barbara Basin.


Image credit: (c) 2002 David Field

Foraminifera (forams) are small, amoeba-like organisms that live inside shells ("tests") such as those shown here. These forams were collected from the waters overlying the Santa Barbara Basin.


Image credit: (c) 1997 Vicente Ferreira-Bartrina

Researchers collect a box core of sediment from the Santa Barbara Basin. To collect a box core, a metal box, about a meter and a half long and 20 centimeters wide, is lowered down to the sea bottom, where it sinks into the soft sediment. After the box core is brought back to the surface, undisturbed layers of sediment can be collected from the inner portion of the core.


Image credit: (c) 1997 Vicente Ferreira-Bartrina

Researchers collect a box core of sediment from the Santa Barbara Basin. To collect a box core, a metal box, about a meter and a half long and 20 centimeters wide, is lowered down to the sea bottom, where it sinks into the soft sediment. After the box core is brought back to the surface, undisturbed layers of sediment can be collected from the inner portion of the core.


Image credit: (c) 1997 Vicente Ferreira-Bartrina

Researchers collect a box core of sediment from the Santa Barbara Basin. To collect a box core, a metal box, about a meter and a half long and 20 centimeters wide, is lowered down to the sea bottom, where it sinks into the soft sediment. After the box core is brought back to the surface, undisturbed layers of sediment can be collected from the inner portion of the core.


Image credit: (c) 1992 Lori Saldaña

Researchers prepare box corer for taking sediment samples from the Santa Barbara Basin. To collect a box core, a metal box, about a meter and a half long and 20 centimeters wide, is lowered down to the sea bottom, where it sinks into the soft sediment. After the box core is brought back to the surface, undisturbed layers of sediment can be collected from the inner portion of the core. Oceanographer Andy Soutar, on the left, invented this particular coring device.


Image credit: Image: (c) 2005 David Field

This section of a sediment core from the Santa Barbara Channel shows the annual layers of sediments laid down each year. The scale to the right of the core is marked in centimeters.


Image credit: (c) 1992 Lori Saldaña

Researchers recover a long "Kasten core" filled with sediment from the Santa Barbara Basin. Such long cores may contain sediment layers up to 1,400 years old.


Image credit: (c) 1992 Lori Saldaña

Oceanographer Andy Soutar helps recover a long "Kasten core" filled with sediment from the Santa Barbara Basin. Such long cores may contain sediment layers up to 1,400 years old.

Last updated: Apr. 12, 2012