Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Press Room
03 February 2004

Images related to the MBARI news release
New "bumpy" jelly found in deep sea

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from MBARI. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should contact Kim Fulton-Bennett, kfb@mbari.org, 831-775-1835.


Image credit: © 2003 MBARI

Stellamedusa ventana is a newly described species of jelly that lives hundreds of meters below the surface of the ocean. Its translucent bell is about the size of a softball. This individual was photographed during MBARI's expedition to the Gulf of California in Spring 2003.


Image credit: © 2003 MBARI

Stellamedusa ventana has been observed off the coast of California and in the Gulf of California, but the full extent of its range remains unknown. In over thirteen years of deep-ocean diving, MBARI scientists have only seen this jelly seven times.


Image credit: Kevin Raskoff © 2003 MBARI

Using a remotely operated vehicle, MBARI researchers captured this Stellamedusa ventana and brought it into the laboratory to study its eating habits.


Image credit: Kevin Raskoff © 2003 MBARI

This laboratory photo shows the bumps that give Stellamedusa ventana its common name, "Bumpy." Each bump contains hundreds of stinging cells, used for capturing and holding on to prey.


Image credit: Kevin Raskoff © 2003 MBARI

The bumps on Stellamedusa ventana's bell and arms are loaded with stinging cells (nematocysts) that can capture and hold on to prey up to 5 cm (2 inches) across. In this close-up image, the nematocysts give the tip of each bump a frosted appearance.

Last updated: May. 14, 2012