Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Press Room
13 December 2004

Images related to the MBARI news release
Ancient islands off Southern California

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from MBARI. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should send an email to pressroom@mbari.org.


Image credit: (c) 2004 MBARI

Area map showing the locations of the three seamounts that appear to have been volcanic islands between 10 and 14 million years ago.


Image credit: (c) 2003 MBARI

This photograph was taken by MBARI's Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Tiburon about 680 meters below the surface at Rodriguez Seamount. The layered rocks are hypothesized to be ancient beach sands from a time when this seamount was a volcanic island off the coast of Southern California. This photograph also shows a few of the deep-water marine animals that inhabit the slopes of these seamounts.


Image credit: (c) 2003 MBARI

When MBARI researchers dove on Rodriguez Seamount they were surprised to see rocks such as these, which appear to have been sculpted by wave action, but are currently 635 meters below the sea surface (far below the reach of the largest storm waves).


Image credit: (c) 2003 MBARI

These boulders at Rodriguez Seamount appear to have been rolled around the sea floor and rounded off by waves in shallow water when the seamount was an island.


Image credit: (c) 2004 MBARI

Like many organisms living on seamounts, this "mushroom coral" captures minute food particles that drift past on the ocean currents.


Image credit: (c) 2004 MBARI

Deep-water corals such as these grow very slowly. If undisturbed, coral colonies on seamounts may live for hundreds of years.


Image credit: (c) 2004 MBARI

Large deep-water sponges often provide sanctuaries for many smaller animals such as these three crabs.

Last updated: Apr. 12, 2012