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08 December 2003

Images related to the MBARI news release
MBARI research highlights—AGU 2003 Fall Meeting

Note: These images may not be copied, reprinted, or used without explicit permission from MBARI. Members of the media needing higher-resolution versions should fill out our online image request form or contact Kim Fulton-Bennett, kfb@mbari.org, 831-775-1835. (From December 8 to 10, 2003, Kim Fulton-Bennett can be reached via email or in the AGU Press Room at (415) 348-4440).


Image credit: Jenny Paduan © 2003 MBARI

Image for: "Explosive volcanism in the deep sea"
Limu o Pele is the Hawaiian name for thin, translucent fragments of volcanic glass that represent the shattered fragments of lava bubbles. Such gas-filled bubbles were once thought to form only in shallow water, where seawater contacts hot lava, forming steam. However, MBARI researchers recently observed Limu o Pele in volcanic rocks that erupted in the deep ocean, as much as 4,200 meters (over two and a half miles) below the surface.


Image credit: © 2003 
MBARI; sonar image by U.S. Geological Survey

Image for: "Explosive volcanism in the deep sea"

The North Arch volcanic field (highlighted in red) is a thin but extensive lava flow that formed after the main island-forming volcanic eruptions on the Hawaiian island of Oahu. Unlike "late-stage" eruptions on land, this submarine flow field involves very large quantities of lava. Areas of hard sea-bottom, such as lava fields, reflect sound better than areas covered by thick sediment, and appear lighter in this sonar image prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey.


Image credit: © 2003 
MBARI

Image for: "Finding jellies in marine snow"
This pair of images shows a single frame from an MBARI video taken during a survey of midwater animals. The upper image shows a barely visible siphonophore (middle) and a jelly (lower left). The lower image shows this same frame, in which the computer has picked out these animals from among the marine snow and debris, even though they are barely visible to the untrained eye. Note: These images have been enhanced for publication. The original frame is darker and has even less contrast.


Image credit: Gary Greene © 2003 MBARI

Image for: "Dating underwater landslides"
This colored bathymetric map shows the "Goleta Slide," a very large underwater landslide just west of Santa Barbara, in Southern California. Call-outs show the different sections of the slide, some of which may have failed at different times. To get an idea of the size of this slide, consider that the scale bar at lower right is two kilometers (1.25 miles) long.


Image credit: © 2003 
MBARI

Image for: "Rocks that grow overnight"
These hydrothermal chimneys in the Guaymas Basin of the Gulf of California, Mexico were photographed by MBARI's remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The "smoke" is composed of small mineral particles coming out of solution when hot hydrothermal fluids contact cold seawater.


Image credit: © 2003 
MBARI

Image for: "Rocks that grow overnight"
This hydrothermal chimney in the Guaymas Basin of the Gulf of California grew by one meter (about three feet) in 24 hours. The tube coming out the right side of the chimney leads to an MBARI monitoring instrument, which was encased in solid rock.


Image credt: © 2003 
MBARI

Image for: "Rocks that grow overnight"
MBARI's remotely operated vehicle Tiburon retrieved this fragment of a hydrothermal vent from the Guaymas Basin in the Gulf of California. The melon-sized piece of sulfide encased an MBARI instrument just four days after it was deployed. The instrument, a thermocouple array, recorded temperatures of fluids inside the vent and within its rock walls, while the vent grew around it.


Image credit: © 2003 
MBARI

Image for: "Rocks that grow overnight"
These unique undersea images show the growth of a hydrothermal chimney in the Guaymas Basin of the Gulf of California. The two photographs were taken about 2 months apart. As the chimney grew, it encased a fluid sampler, which was installed at the site to measure the chemical properties of water within the chimney walls. In the left-hand photo, you can see the recently-installed sampler hanging off the side of the chimney. In the right-hand image, all you can see is a hose at the lower end of the sampler; the rest of the sampler has been encased in solid rock.