Last day

November 13, 2013

We have had an amazingly productive cruise. On day one, we assembled a list of target species amongst the science team and collaborators from all over who couldn’t come along. The list was quite long and we managed to check almost every single species off our list. The weather was beautiful all week. The only wind we encountered was in the last few hours of our dive today. We did have to pull the ROV early, but considering what good luck we’ve had, we’re happy.

Panorama of the back deck. The trawl net hangs to dry on the A-frame. You can’t tell from the image, but the wind came up to over 28 knots this afternoon.

Panorama of the back deck. The trawl net hangs to dry on the A-frame. You can’t tell from the image, but the wind came up to over 28 knots this afternoon.

We could not have had such a successful cruise without the tireless efforts of our ROV pilots and the Western Flyer crew. They work long hours and we want them all to know how much we appreciate how smoothly they keep our cruises going. We are also especially thankful to our cook, Patrick Mitts. He keeps us all well-fed (for some, too well), accommodating a variety of diets. On behalf of the entire science team—thanks everyone!

A rare photo of almost all of the ship’s engineers having a very important meeting in the galley. These guys work very hard, but it is hard to capture all that they do in a photo because much of their work is below decks. From left, Electronics Officer Dan Chamberlain, Relief Chief Engineer Lance Wardle, Relief First Engineer Fred Peemoeller, Second Engineer Jason Jordan. Not pictured are Olin Jordan who was working his rounds and Chief Engineer Matt Noyes who got to take this cruise off.

A rare photo of almost all of the ship’s engineers having a very important meeting in the galley. These guys work very hard, but it is hard to capture all that they do in a photo because much of their work is below decks. From left, Electronics Officer Dan Chamberlain, Relief Chief Engineer Lance Wardle, Relief First Engineer Fred Peemoeller, Second Engineer Jason Jordan. Not pictured are Olin Jordan who was working his rounds and Chief Engineer Matt Noyes who got to take this cruise off.


Panorama of the ship’s bridge, where the captain drives the ship. From far left, Relief Chief Engineer Lance Wardle and Captain Aaron Gregg, who normally sails as captain on our other ship, the Rachel Carson, but sailed as relief on this trip. Thanks, Aaron!

Panorama of the ship’s bridge, where the captain drives the ship. From far left, Relief Chief Engineer Lance Wardle and Captain Aaron Gregg, who normally sails as captain on our other ship, the Rachel Carson, but sailed as relief on this trip. Thanks, Aaron!


Panorama of the moonpool after the ROV recovery. Crew, pilots, and scientists are all busy when the ROV comes on deck. Pilots secure the ROV and then, with the help of crew, prepare the tether for the next deployment while the science team unloads samples.

Panorama of the moonpool after the ROV recovery. Crew, pilots, and scientists are all busy when the ROV comes on deck. Pilots secure the ROV and then, with the help of crew, prepare the tether for the next deployment while the science team unloads samples.

—Susan von Thun