Some amazing organisms

October 24, 2012

Before talking about today’s double-dive day, we wanted to share some of the images from last night following the return of the remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to the surface. Once the ROV gets back to the Western Flyer, there is an organized frenzy of activity as we remove all the samples from the ROV and get them into the wet lab for processing.

The

The “organized frenzy” of post-dive sample processing.

We recovered the trawl around 9:30 p.m. and brought that back to the lab for processing as well. Henk-Jan Hoving launched the camera again and recovered it this morning at 5:45 a.m.

Kris Walz and Rob Sherlock sort through the night's trawl.

Kris Walz and Rob Sherlock sort through the night’s trawl.

At 6:30 a.m. we started our first dive today in relatively shallow waters and then headed over to the Midwater Respirometry System (MRS) mooring to pick the MRS up. We returned to the ship with the MRS, and Kim Reisenbichler removed the animals to continue working on them in the shipboard lab. We then returned the ROV to the ocean for our second dive of the day.

We saw some amazing organisms today, and some surprises. Taonius is always entertaining to watch—we took some video and let this animal swim away. We found Octopoteuthis with a fascinating circle of spermatangia on her back. Once this female is ready, she will fertilize her eggs from the sperm contained in these spermatangia. And then we found a ctenophore—Lampocteis—a beautiful red lobate ctenophore that was being eaten by Aegina—a narcomedusa jelly.

Taonius borealis.

Taonius borealis.


Octopoteuthis deletron.

Octopoteuthis deletron.


A red lobate ctenophore Lampocteis being eaten by the narcomedusa jelly Aegina.

A red lobate ctenophore Lampocteis being eaten by the narcomedusa jelly Aegina.

—George Matsumoto