Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

People
Seamounts Cruise, Date 2004

Click on any name to read an interview:
David Clague
, Alice Davis, Jenny Paduan, Lonny Lundsten; Joe Jones, Jim Hein, Brandie McIntyre, Kathie Marsaglia, Tessa Hill

David Clague    top of page
MBARI Marine Geologist  

http://www.mbari.org/staff/clague

What is your role on this cruise?
I will be the Chief Scientist on the cruise.

What are your primary goals?
We are trying to learn how, when and why volcanoes formed near the California margin. To do this, we collect rock samples that we can age-date to determine the when part. We also analyze the rocks to determine their chemistry that tells us about how deep the magmas were generated and what melted under what conditions to form the magmas. We also look at the samples and the outcrops on the seafloor to determine what the eruptions were like--was the lava effusive or explosive. Lastly, we want to understand why the volcanoes formed and how they relate to the evolution of the margin of California during and after the time when the San Andreas fault system formed.

What do you expect to find?
Mn-covered lava and volcaniclastic deposits. Maybe some beach cobble or sand deposits on the shallower seamounts. Lots of animals living on the rocks. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
  My favorite part of a research cruise is the intensity of new discoveries and incorporating what we have just seen into the plans for the rest of the dive or the next dives. Worst part is dealing with bad weather that can prevent our planned programs from happening. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
Love finding out how the world works and wanted to get paid to do it. I took lots of science and math classes in high school and college and majored in geology, then on to graduate school in oceanography.

Alicé Davis    top of page
MBARI Research Specialist  

What is your role on this cruise?
My primary role on this cruise is to keep track of the samples collected and the descriptive notes taken on the dives. 

What are your primary goals?
My primary goal is to have a concise inventory of samples collected so we will be able to get started on the chemical analyses as soon as we return.

What do you expect to find?
I hope we get lots of samples with fresh volcanic glass because it allows us to interpret volcanic processes better than with whole rock samples that are frequently altered.  

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part of the cruise is seeing the fascinating underwater landscape and exotic critters. My least favorite part is leaving my garden, especially at this time of year.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I wanted to be a scientist (actually an astronomer) since I was about 6 years old. My mother told me girls could not be scientist. I got married and had two children before I started College. I fell in love with geology when I saw the red rock deserts of the southwest. I became intrigued with volcanoes in college and for over twenty years I have studied volcanic rocks on the ocean floor all over the Pacific Ocean. 

Jenny Paduan    top of page
MBARI Senior Research Technician  

http://www.mbari.org/staff/paje

What is your role on this cruise?
General science support: prepping all the lab supplies before the cruise and shipping everything home at the end; preparing the real-time GIS beforehand, using it during dives to track where the ROV is on our bathymetric maps, and making dive track maps afterward; annotating the ROV video during dives; making sure the samples don't get mixed up when the sample drawer gets emptied on deck; and then cleaning, photographing, and bagging the samples afterward. When we get home the real work begins!

What are your primary goals?
That everything runs smoothly. My wishes: That we get to all the dive targets we are planning and can collect all the samples we hope to find.

What do you expect to find?
I hope to find Manganese-covered, weathered, old lava, lots of animals exploiting the lava's hard substrate and lofty position in the ocean currents, and if we're really lucky, Architeuthis, the elusive giant squid!

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite: the excitement of new discoveries, piecing together scientific puzzles, exploration. Least favorite: getting seasick.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I have always loved science: What are the plants around me, the animals, rocks, landforms, the stars? What are they made of? How did they get to be the way they are? What makes them function and persist? How are we impacting them? I love the interdisciplinary nature of Oceanography: to understand the ecology of an animal, you must also understand the chemistry, physics, and geology of its habitat. When I was young, I wanted to study volcanoes, then to become an astronomer, then a veterinarian. I was a biochemistry major at a liberal arts college, and went to graduate school to study marine biochemical ecology. Fortunately, along the way I took several geology courses, because my path has taken me full circle back to studying volcanoes! 

Lonny Lundsten    top of page
MBARI Research Technician  

http://www.mbari.org/staff/lonny

What is your role on this cruise?
I will be in charge of video data management, utilizing MBARI's Video Annotation Reference System to annotate video data in real time. My work entails identifying unique biological and geological features that will be seen during the dive, while using MBARI created software to log the observations. Additionally, I will be assisting with the collection and processing of specimens collected during the cruise, preparing them to be for specific identification and further analysis by MBARI scientists.

What are your primary goals?
My goal is to be an asset to the science party.

What do you expect to find?
I hope to learn more about the biologically unique communities found on these seamounts. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part of going on an MBARI research cruise is when I see a new, unique, interesting, or stunningly beautiful organism, which poignantly makes me realize how much of the oceans have yet to be discovered and described. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I decided to get into the marine sciences because of my desire to learn and understand more about the marine environment and it's varied habitats. I received a B.S. in Marine Ecology at CSU Monterey Bay and am Pursuing a M.S. at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. 

Joe Jones    top of page
MBARI Research Technician  

What is your role on this cruise?
My role on this cruise will be assisting with sorting and organizing organisms we bring up with the ROV. I will also be performing tissue dissections and DNA extractions on tissue samples we collect.

What are your primary goals?
My primary goal is to sort and preserve biological samples from the ROV dives so that they are catalogued and archived. 

What do you expect to find?
I
hope to find additional populations of seamount animals that our lab is studying.  We use genetic tools to determine relationships among seamount organisms from throughout the Eastern Pacific. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part of a research cruise is the total immersion (pun partially intended) in the dive and the sample processing.  Working until 2 AM is not that bad with all the excitement of the new animals and rocks.  The least favorite part for me is being away from my loved ones. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
When I was growing up in South Carolina, my parents would take my sister and I to the beach for a family vacation. My parents encouraged my interest in nature and the ocean when I was about 5 years old. I became fascinated with the diversity of tide pools and learning about the tides.  My family owns a lot of land with ponds and creeks where I spent a lot of time exploring. My fascination with fish, in particular, started when I was old enough to hold a fishing rod and has increased continuously since. Also when I was growing up, I was interested in how things work and why certain animals were found certain places and not others. I obtained my B.S. at the University of South Carolina in the Marine Science Program. I spent a lot of time volunteering in an ichthyology research lab where I became serious about my pursuit of a Ph.D. I also became involved with the Marine Science Undergraduate Society (MSUS) where I helped organize undergraduate research trips to local barrier islands. During my senior year, I did an independent research project in Dr. Joe Quattro¹s lab on population genetics of an estuarine flatfish. Dr. Quattro encouraged me to return to his lab after a brief summer at the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research (NIOZ) working as a visiting scientist. I returned to Dr. Quattro¹s lab where I became involved in a number of projects ranging from population genetic structure of summer flounder (my Master¹s thesis) to conservation genetics of pygmy sunfishes in the southeast United States.  I moved to UC Santa Cruz following my Master¹s where I worked in Dr. Giacomo Bernardi¹s lab. I focused on two native California freshwater minnow species using DNA markers and phylogenetic methods. After my Ph.D., I went to Germany where I worked in Dr. Axel Meyer¹s lab on color genes in a Central American cichlid fish. Currently, I am working as a research technician for Dr. Bob Vrijenhoek at MBARI. 

Jim Hein  top of page
Marine Geologist, Geochemist, and Paleoceanographer

Coastal and Marine Geology

U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA

http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov

What is your role on this cruise?
My interest is in seamount-hosted deep-sea mineral deposits, and therefore, my role on the cruise is to study such deposits on seamounts located offshore California. Examples of these deposits include cobalt-rich iron-manganese crusts, phosphorites, barite, and polymetallic sulfides. Researchers have two interests in these types of mineral deposits:(1) their economic potential and use as analogs to on-land mineral deposits found in the geologic record; and (2) their use as recorders of paleoceanographic changes, such as changes in primary productivity, current patterns, climate, and erosion rates of the continents. We will compare the deposits collected on this cruise from a continental margin setting with strong coastal upwelling to similar deposits found on seamounts in open-ocean settings.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Less is known about the deep ocean than the surface of the moon and every cruise dedicated to the study of the deep ocean makes fundamental new discoveries. This is my primary attraction to marine geology and my favorite part of research cruises. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I received a B.A. in Geology from Oregon State University in 1969 and a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1973. I have been a marine geologist with the USGS since 1974. Recently, I have been involved in studies of hydrothermal deposits that occur at oceanic fracture zones, island arcs (including a cruise to the Mariana arc, March/April 2004), and spreading centers. I have authored or co-authored over 340 papers and abstracts and I am a Fellow of both the Society of Economic Geologists and the Geological Society of America and was President of the International Marine Minerals Society.

Brandie McIntyre    top of page
USGS Physical Science Technician 

What is your role on this cruise?
Sampling

What are your primary goals?
Collect samples for paleo-oceanography and mineral resource assessment

What do you expect to find?
I hope to find lots of Fe-Mn crust

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
  I don't know yet, this is my maiden voyage on a research cruise!

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
Brandie R. McIntyre received a B.Sc. (geology) from California State University, Fresno and joined the U.S. Geological Survey in 2001 as a Physical Science Technician. She is currently working on her graduate degree (geology) and teaching credential at San Jose State University and is doing research on marine mineral deposits and environmental geochemistry. She got here with lots of hard work and lots of luck! 

Kathie Marsaglia    top of page
Assistant Professor
Geological Sciences
California State University Northridge  

 http://www.csun.edu/%7Ekmm61309 

What is your role on this cruise?
marine sedimentologist

What are your primary goals?
1) to learn about the volcanic, sedimentologic and tectonic history of the California Borderlands
2) to learn about ROV technology and MBARI

What do you expect to find?
I hope to find lots of interesting sediments and sedimentary rocks

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
favorites

  • observing things that no one has seen before and trying to explain them
  • the smell of the ocean
  • meeting new people and learning about different disciplines/technologies

least favorites

  • waking up to go on shift
  • stormy seas

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I enjoy deciphering the mysteries of the deep from the sedimentary record. I got here only with the support of family, professors and colleagues plus some luck and a lot of hard work.

Tessa Hill   top of page
UCSB Graduate Researcher 

What is your role on this cruise?
On this cruise, I will be observing, learning about, and hopefully collecting deep sea corals that live on the seamounts.   

What are your primary goals?
I hope to analyze the geochemistry of the corals we collect to understand past deep ocean temperature changes.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite parts of going on research cruises are.... the view of the ocean every day and learning new things. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I am currently finishing my PhD at UCSB and I'll be starting a post-doctoral position next fall at UC Davis, where I will study the deep sea corals that we collect on this cruise. I got into this field because of a curiosity and interest in the ocean and climate change. I studied marine science as an undergraduate at Eckerd College (FL) and have spent the past 5 years at UCSB studying records of climate change from sediment cores.