Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

People

Keck Expedition 2004

Click on any name to read an interview (this list includes crew from both Leg 2 and Leg 4):
Debra Stakes, Paul McGill, Will Willcock; Tony Ramirez, Ben Potter, Mike Conway, Andrew Barclay, Doug Toomey, Troy Durant, Taimi Mulder, John Rostau, Jim Gill, George Kamenov, Lonny Lundsten, Frank Ramos, Mike Perfit, Sarah Langberg; Laurie Ann Cotsonika; Deb Glickson

Barclay.jpg (158190 bytes)Andrew Barclay  top of page
Title: Acting Assistant Professor

andrew@ocean.washington.edu

What is your role on this cruise?
We are going to be retrieving and then redeploying eight seismometers that have been operating on the seafloor at the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge for the past year.  In the few days the seismometers will be aboard ship, we have to identify (and fix) any problems.  My main tasks are to help to make sure that the seismometer data -- all 250 Gb -- are properly saved and copied to DVD and hard drive, and then to look for known earthquakes in the continuous seismograms in order to determine whether each seismometer worked properly. 

What are your primary goals?
To help to collect a year's worth of seismic data from the seafloor, and to help to deploy 13 seismometers on the seafloor that will record earthquakes, ships, storms and whales for the next year. 

What do you expect to find?
I expect to find recordings of a very large number of small earthquakes that have occurred around the Endeavour segment and hydrothermal vent fields during the past year. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite:  The excitement of seeing a tract of seafloor that nobody has ever seen before.  The food is very good. Least favorite:  Being seasick (this sometimes conflicts with the good food. ). 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I enjoy the variety of this job.  You get a whole lot of different experiences:  working closely with all different kinds of people, working with math and computers, being able to go to sea, trying (usually failing) to understand rocks, setting your own schedule, writing papers, teaching, and traveling to meetings in interesting places. 

mike_conway.jpg (58748 bytes)Mike Conway    top of page
MBARI Marine Operations Technician  

http://www.mbari.org/staff/comi

What is your role on this cruise?
I am here to set up and assist in the deployment of the equipment I built for this cruise, primarily the platform elevator and glass bead hopper. The platform elevator transports equipment to and from the bottom independent of the ROV. I have to calculate the flotation we will need as well as the anchor weights. Its actually a lot more complicated than it sounds, especially when you consider the elevator will free fall through the water over 2400 meters deep. I am also going to help the ROV pilots whenever I can.

What are your primary goals?
My primary goal is to make sure everything gets deployed and recovered safely. I am also here to assist when ever possible.

What do you expect to find?
Hopefully beautiful weather and everything working flawlessly.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part of a research cruise is seeing equipment I built working on the bottom of the sea. My least favorite part of a cruise is when weather restricts or prevents us from carrying out our objectives.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
My job title is “Marine Operations Technician”. I was a research diver and ROV pilot, so I have a pretty good idea what works and what does not below the surface of the ocean. Our scientists know what they want to accomplish, but they often leave it up to me to figure out how to make it happen. I have to be a “jack of all trades” in my job. I often use 3 D CAD programs to design, machines to fabricate and seamanship skills to deploy the equipment I build. I enjoy building things and this career allows me to build some really cool things. I have degrees in Biology, Electronics, and Commercial Diving. This job requires skills I have learned from my educational background as well on the job training I get everyday.

Laurie Ann Cotsonika  (Top of page)
Master's Student, University of Florida

What is your role on this cruise? 
I will be collecting samples from the Southern Cleft segment and the ridge transform intersect (RTI) for my thesis project.

What do you expect to find?
I hope to gain insight into the reasons why volcanism occurs at the RTI. 

What are your primary goals?
To collect good samples for research purposes, as well as gain cruise experience.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
I just love being at sea.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am a master’s student at UF studying mid ocean ridge basalts (MORB).  I truly enjoy the field of geology and I find my specialty especially fascinating.  I have wanted to be an oceanographer since 6th grade and reading 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, because I wanted to see all the things the book described.  I focused more on science throughout my high school career and completed my Bachelor’s in Oceanography at the University of Michigan. I then continued on to University of Florida for my Master’s.

Durant.jpg (297845 bytes)Troy Durant    top of page
Graduate Student  University of Oregon

What is your role on this cruise?
I am a scientist, research assistant, general helper, etc.

What are your primary goals?
My primary goal is to assist with the the recovery of scientific data. This leads to my secondary goal, which is to assist with the recovery, restoration and redeployment of our seismometers currently on the seafloor, as well as to deploy several new seismometers.

What do you expect to find?
Our seismometers!!! And then, lots and lots of great scientific data!!!

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part of the cruise is just being out at sea. There is something kind of magical about being at sea that is very difficult to describe with words. It is a place far removed from the worries and stresses of regular daily life. It is a place that allows me to reflect upon deeper thoughts.
My least favorite part of the cruise is being away from my wonderful wife and three beautiful daughters.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am a graduate student studying geophysics at the University of Oregon. I became a graduate student to pursue a career in the physical sciences. I have always had a passion for science and education. Becoming a graduate student took a lot of hard work, dedication and many hours of study.

gill.jpg (23880 bytes)Jim Gill    top of page
Professor Earth Sciences UCSC
webpage address  http://es.ucsc.edu/~jgill/

What is your role on this cruise?
Co-chief scientist for Endeavour segment

What are your primary goals?
Collect fresh basalt samples that reflect the range of magma compositions at this ridge segment, and locate these within a geologic and tectonic context. Constrain the age of the geomorphology -- when did the axial valley form? Use the major, trace, and volatile element compositions of the basalts, and the radiogenic isotopes and U-series disequilibriia, to understand the source of the magma and the melting processes that deliver them to the surface.

What do you expect to find?
We expect to find at least a factor three variation in incompatible trace element ratios of basalts within less than 1 km across strike. This is especially remarkable because there is an underlying magma lens that might be expected to homogenize magmatic output. The basalt diversity may assist geological mapping. We also expect to find young (<10,000 y old) volcanism on at least the eastern flank of the ridge. The high concentrations of many trace elements together with their extreme U-series disequilibria suggest that melting is atypically deep and the source is atypically wet. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite part is when the ROV arrives on deck with its payload.
Least favorite parts are bad weather and mechanical malfunctions.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
Professor. Why did you decide to become one? I enjoy discovering new information and telling other people about it. I also enjoy international travel and collaborations. And how did you become one? Started as a mineral collector, then mining geologist, then grad student. Took a job at an experimental university and stayed there.

Deb Glickson   top of page
PhD. Student; Univ. of Washington 

What is your role on this cruise?
To collect geologic data at the northern end of the Endeavour Segment through visual imagery and rock samples.  I am working on a synthesis of geologic data across the whole segment, which is challenging because it has been collected over many years with many different vehicles.

What are your primary goals?
To learn more about the geological setting of the Endeavour Segment and how the geology might relate to the geochemical variations that are being studied by other scientists on board.

What do you expect to find?
Lots and lots of basalt!

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part is sitting in the control room watching the seafloor. Even if we've been to the same spot many times before, it's still fascinating that we're interacting with an environment over 2000m away.  My least favorite is seasickness, because it always happens to me.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I'm a Oceanography graduate student going into my third year at the University of Washington.  After getting a Master's degree in Geology and working as a research associate in Physical Oceanography for two and a half years, I decided to go back for my PhD in Marine Geology.

George Kamenov   top of page
PhD. Student
http://plaza.ufl.edu/kamenov 

What is your role on this cruise?
I will assist in collecting lava samples and then, back in the University of Florida I will be involved in their trace element and isotope analyses.

What are your primary goals?
The primary goal is to collect hardrock samples. Personally for me, this cruise is also a great opportunity to get seagoing experience. 

What do you expect to find?
Not sure, but we expect to recover some evolved (andesites, dacites) lavas that will provide valuable information about the magmatic evolution of the Mid-Ocean Ridges.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Well, this is my first one, so don't know yet, but I like boating and diving, so I guess the cruise will be very enjoyable experience

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am a Ph.D. student working with Mike Perfit on magmatism and hydrothermal processes in SW Pacific seamounts and islands. The sea has been my "hobby" since I was small kid. My favorite books were all about seagoing expeditions and marine explorers, such as Ferdinand Magellan, James Cook, Jacques Cousteau. I became actively involved in Marine Geology during my undergraduate years when I worked on mineralogy of metalliferous sediments from TAG hydrothermal field, Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Later on, I did a M.S. on Andean ore deposits, and now I am "back" to the ocean working on geochemistry of submarine seamounts.  

Sarah Langberg   top of page
High School Student Intern

What is your role on this cruise?
I will be continuing my role as a research intern under Dr. Michael Perfit from the University of Florida Department of Geological Sciences.

What are your primary goals?
My main goal is to absorb as much knowledge as possible from the scientists on board. I am looking forward to becoming familiar with the physical geology that provides the chemical data that I am used to working with in a laboratory setting. I am very excited to experience the Juan de Fuca Ridge first hand and participate in sample collection.

What do you expect to find?
Hopefully we will find some rocks of geochemical interest expanding from previously explored traverse-axis dives.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
This is my first time on a research cruise of any sort, but I am sure that my favorite aspect will be being surrounded by scientists and immense amounts of knowledge at all times. I am sure I will love being out at sea and experiencing the technology that allows samples to be collected from the seafloor, first hand. Least favorite? Probable cold weather (with respect for Florida, that is

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am currently a student—a senior in high school. I am also a research intern under Dr. Perfit. I became one to gain knowledge and experience in the geological sciences and to explore possible scientific careers. I found the geological sciences lab through University of Florida high school outreach programs familiarizing students with science. I was able to intern with Dr. Perfit during the summers of 2003 and 2004 and greatly enjoyed my research experiences.

Lonny Lundsten    top of page
MBARI Research Technician
http://www.mbari.org/staff/lonny

What is your role on this cruise?
I will be in charge of video data management, utilizing MBARI's Video Annotation Reference System to annotate video data in real time. My work entails identifying unique biological and geological features that will be seen during the dive, while using MBARI designed software to log the observations. Additionally, I will be assisting with the collection andprocessing of samples collected during the cruise, preparing them for identification and further analysis by MBARI scientists.

What are your primary goals?
My goal is to work hard and learn as much as I from everyone else on the cruise.

What do you expect to find?
I hope to learn more about the biologically unique communities associated with the unique geology of the survey area. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part of going on an MBARI research cruise seeing new, unique, interesting, or stunningly beautiful organism, which poignantly makes me realize how much of the oceans have yet to be discovered. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
My job title is video lab research technician. I study marine ecology because of my desire understand more about the unique organisms that inhabit the marine environment and how the habitats in which they are found support such diverse communities. I received a B.S. in Marine Ecology at CSU Monterey Bay and am pursuing a M.S. at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories. 

Paul McGill    top of page
MBARI Electrical Engineer  

http://www.mbari.org/staff/mcgill

What is your role on this cruise?
I'm a co-Chief Scientist, which means I'm sharing the Chief Scientist's duties with Will Wilcock of the University of Washington.  The Chief Scientist's role is to make sure the ship's crew knows where we'd like to go and what we'd like to do with the ship, and to lead the science crew to accomplish all of our science goals.

What are your primary goals?
Our primary goal is to recover the seismic data from an array of eight seismometers that we deployed one year ago.  After we recover the data, we'll redeploy the seismometers with fresh batteries and empty data disks for recovery next year.  We'll also deploy five additional seismometers at new sites. 

What do you expect to find?
We expect to find eight seismometers each containing a year's worth of high-quality data.  This will be the most seismic data ever recorded by local instruments in this region.  We expect the data to reveal a great deal about the structure of this volcanically active region. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My least favorite part of a research cruise is preparing to leave - there's so much to do and I'm always wondering what I've forgotten.  My favorite part is getting that first look at the data from a seafloor instrument - I never know what secrets will be revealed. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I'm an electrical engineer.  I've always been interested in science and technology.  I learned a lot through reading and my own projects, and I got my formal education at Stanford University.

mulder_.jpg (68578 bytes)

Taimi Mulder top of page
Seismologist

http://www.pgc.nrcan.gc.ca 

What is your role on this cruise?
Seismologist.

What are your primary goals?
Staying afloat. And some earthquake analysis from ocean bottom seismometers, including incorporation of data into routine seismic processing of earthquakes off the northwest coast of North America .

What do you expect to find?
Sea creatures. Hopefully they won’t make too much noise on the seismometers. Also hoping to find that the ocean bottom seismometers which have escaped the sea creatures will give significant improvements in locating earthquakes in the region.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favourite – just being at sea. Least favourite – being seasick.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
Title – Seismologist. My first job after graduating in Geophysics from the University of British Columbia was dirt bagging for a geological contracting company and my second was running a geophysical observatory in the high arctic, predominantly a seismological and magnetic observatory. That was the beginning of it all. After a return to school and several jobs in various parts of the world, I am currently employed as an earthquake seismologist with the Geological Survey of Canada (Natural Resources Canada).

MP with core.JPG (675373 bytes)Mike Perfit top of page
Professor of Geological Sciences

http://www.geology.ufl.edu/PerfitWebsite/ 

What is your role on this cruise?
I am one of the igneous petrologists and volcanologists on the cruise (along with Debra Stakes and Jim Gill). I will be sampling basalts using the ROV and a wax corer from discrete sections of the southern Cleft segment, making sure that we know their exact tectonic and morphologic associations as well as their relative ages compared to the youngest basalts in the axis. The second part of the cruise will be at the Endeavor segment where I plan to help Jim Gill with his dives and sampling.
Back in my labs at the University of Florida, my students and I will be analyzing the glass from the exterior crusts of the lavas for major and trace elements, and some of them for their isotopic composition. 
My other role is to mentor and teach the students I am bringing on this cruise. I have three students from UF who will be helping us – none of them have ever been on an oceanographic cruise. They have a lot to learn and I look forward to helping them.

What are your primary goals?
The overall goal of our project on the southern Cleft is to further our fundamental understanding of how the oceanic crust is formed and how intermediate spreading rate ridges evolve over time.  More specifically, during this cruise we are completing a set of dives that first started in 2000.   We plan to integrate bathymetric, volcanologic, petrologic and observational data in order to identify individual flow units and discrete eruptive episodes along the ridge axis and in off-axis environments. Determining the off-axis eruptive history is necessary to test the “split-ridge” hypothesis which proposes the JdFR undergoes tectonomagmatic cycles in which a magmatically dominated axial ridge is split and rafted away during the following period of tectonism. The planned field and laboratory research will provide us with a comprehensive petrologic and geochemical data base to test hypotheses regarding chemical heterogeneity of the mantle, magma extraction mechanisms, development of subaxial magma bodies, causes and origins of off-axis volcanism, volumes and chemical variability in individual flow units, and the effects of ridge-transform intersections (RTI) on MORB chemistry. In addition, the data we collect will allow us to determine the spatial and temporal variability/evolution of magmatism on the southern Cleft segment.

What do you expect to find?
I expect to find a great deal of chemical diversity among the lavas we recover, particularly at the RTI where one previous rock core samples and extremely rare oceanic dacite. I also expect to find some relatively young lava flows that erupted off-axis, not within the present zone of active volcanism. Lavas erupted off-axis and those close to the intersection with the Blanco Transform will also have distinct chemical characteristics that reflect cooler environments and smaller magma chambers.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
I really enjoy being out in the open ocean and working closely with a wide variety of people. I have made some great friends over the years while at sea. I also enjoy the exploration aspects of oceanographic research - everything from mapping the bottom, to seeing sections of the seafloor that have never been seen before, to recovering lavas that never thought they would find their way to sunny Florida. It's also a pleasure to leave many of my day-to-day responsibilities back at the University of Florida. Although email has allowed some degree of connection with the real world while we are at sea, not getting phone calls or having papers and tests to grade is very relaxing.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am a Professor at the University of Florida.  I decided that I wanted to teach and do research at a university during my years as an undergraduate in college.  My interests in natural science began when I was a young boy. I remember getting a copy of National Geographic magazine from my aunt and it showed a bearded scientist doing research on the ice cap at the South Pole without a shirt on. For some reason, this image of how exciting exploration could be really affected me. Growing up on Long Island in New York State, I spent much of my time at the beach and in the water. Because I love the ocean and science was one of my better subjects in school I began to think of becoming an oceanographer. In 9th grade, I took an Earth Science class, and the teacher was really enthusiastic about geology and that got me interested rocks....and no! I wasn't a nerd in high school. I went to St. Lawrence University, in upstate New York. My first semester, I took a introductory geology course and that class pretty much sold me on majoring in geology. The professor was a petrologist (a geologist who studies different rocks and what they are made of), and he taught us all about volcanoes and earthquakes which really interested me. After I got my undergraduate degree, I decided that I really wanted to be a full-time scientist and do research and teach. I went to Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, which is part of Columbia University in New York to study marine geology. The combination of my interest in rocks, volcanoes and the oceans lead me to become a marine petrologist/geochemist.

Ben Potter    top of page
MBARI Summer Intern  

What is your role on this cruise?
Since I am interning with Debra Stakes and Paul McGill, my responsibilities include acting as a Research Technician, video-documenting the ROV dives, conducting Seismic Data Analysis, and servicing the batteries, data loggers, and seismometers to be deployed as part of the KECK project.

What are your primary goals?
My foremost goal on the cruise is to learn everything I can; I hope to become much more familiar with ROV operation and technology, as well as with geophysical research and with the mechanics of running a research effort.

What do you expect to find?
I expect to retrieve the seismic records from our already deployed data loggers, both short-period and broadband, and link their recorded seismic activity to events recorded on land. I also hope to identify anomalies both real and artificial in the data. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part is being present for events such as ROV operations, and watching the equipment that I helped build be deployed. My least favorite part is being away and out of direct contact with my family and friends.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am a research intern, which pretty much means that I have my hands in almost every portion of equipment and cruise preparation, equipment deployment, data retrieval, and data analysis. I became one to gain experience and knowledge which will greatly benefit my career as an Ocean Engineer, and also to begin to establish my name in the closely knit field of ocean research. I am an Ocean Engineering undergrad at the University of Rhode Island; when I heard that MBARI had an internship program that would allow me to develop the skills I have been acquiring at college, I applied and soon found myself blissfully knee deep in seismic data and deep sea equipment.

Tony_lab.jpg (235987 bytes)Tony Ramirez    top of page
MBARI Senior Research Technician  

What is your role on this cruise?
LEG 2:  My primary responsibility is to prepare the seismometers and data loggers for deployment with the ROV.  In addition to the deployment of new instrument packages, we also need to recover seismometers and data logger systems deployed last year.  LEG 4: For this leg of the expedition, I am responsible for running ArcNav to supplement the Western Flyer’s ROV navigation.  ArcNav is an extension for ArcView developed within MBARI that imports the shipboard navigation data into the ArcView display and projects the ROV position over bathymetric data.  This enables the science party to tie geologic observations to locations on the bathymetry in real-time, and assists the ROV pilots in navigating through steep or difficult terrain.

What are your primary goals?
LEG 2:  My primary goal for this leg is to do everything possible to ensure the successful deployment, recovery and re-deployment our seismometer systems.  LEG 4:  By using ArcNav for real-time mapping of the seafloor I’m able to create maps for subsequent dive planning during the cruise, and visually present the accomplishments of each dive.  During previous cruises on the Western Flyer, these maps greatly assisted the assimilation of the data collected. My ultimate goal is to expand the ability of the scientists to extract the data collected and make it more easily digestible.

What do you expect to find?
LEG 2:  I’m an optimist and therefore expect to find all 8 seismometer systems deployed last year still working properly with good quality data and no issues with the data archival process.  LEG 4:  The one thing you can always be sure to find when working on or near the spreading ridge axis, both at Cleft and Endeavour, are rocks.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My least favorite part of being at sea for extended periods of time is being gone from my family. To work around this I generally have my family meet me in port stops and see me on and/or off the research vessel. This is actually one of my favorite aspects of a research cruise since it enables additional family vacations to sometimes beautiful and exotic locations. To me, the best part of being a member of an ocean research cruise is working with other scientists with diverse research goals. This gives me exposure to research outside my field of interest, a variety of other research techniques and some very colorful people, which are generally great.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
I'm currently a research technician for a lead scientist at MBARI. One of the strongest influences in my life, and definitely my favorite place to be, is the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The variety of rock types and exposed structures in this high alpine terrain has inspired me to pursue a career in earth sciences, focusing primarily on the geophysical processes which shape the rock we live on. Through the support of the lead scientist and the institution I work for, my progress in becoming a scientist is continuing through education, training and research cruises.

Frank Ramos   top of page
Research Scientist

What is your role on this cruise?
petrologist

What are your primary goals?
I will work especially on the U-series disequilibria

What do you expect to find? 
as above

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
This is my first one.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?

ristau.jpg (71251 bytes)John Ristau  top of page
Seismologist

What is your role on this cruise?
Seismologist.  

What are your primary goals?
Determine if the data from the broadband seismometers is suitable for calculating regional moment tensor solutions.

What do you expect to find?
Hope to find that the ocean bottom seismometers give significant improvements in locating earthquakes and understanding source mechanisms.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
This is my first cruise so I don't have a favorite/least favorite part yet.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
Title - seismologist.  I have had a interest in earthquakes and geology in general for a long time.  I have done research in many areas of geophysics outside of seismology including remote sensing and electromagnetic methods.  I have a Bachelors of Science and a Masters Of Science form the University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and a Ph.D. from the University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. 

Debra Stakes    top of page
MBARI Marine Science Systems Facilitator 

What is your role on this cruise?
My role on this cruise is to handle all of the ROV control room responsibilities while the engineers and technicians are assembling instruments and downloading data. Each instrument turn-around will be very time intensive to check the instrument, back up the data, rebuild the logger and prepare it to be reinstalled. During that time, I will be managing the ROV tapes, keeping everyone informed of the schedule, and writing the web updates for these pages. 

What are your primary goals? 
My (our) goals on this cruise are to bring our instruments and experiments one step closer to being ready for a real-time observatory connection. The success of observatory science is truly going to be an endurance challenge, where instruments will need to function in the freezing cold of the distant seafloor without human oversight for months and even years. All of these instruments have proven their capabilities in shorter deployments in Monterey Bay, but this deployment is the longest ever. 

What do you expect to find?
We hope that the majority of instruments have done their jobs and are full of data to bring home. The data will be used to understand the types of earthquakes in this area, the locations of the smallest earthquakes (that might be related to hydrofracture events) and perhaps even the subsurface movement of magma. All of our instrument sites are marked by acoustic beacons, so we won't need to search around so much for those. The new sites are all supposed to be flat sediment covered areas. We expect the instruments to be there, waiting for us. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
 I love being at sea and participating in the ROV Operations. The ROV is truly a magnificent tool that has greatly expanded our ability to work in the deepest ocean. My favorite part is working with the pilots to figure out how to accomplish some of the more complicated deployments we have planned. My least favorite part is the preparation. It is always a rush with too many personal and business issues to complete. The rest of the team had enormous responsibilities in assembling the hardware, so my hat is off to them.

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one? 
I am MBARI's "Marine Science Systems Facilitator". This is a new position that was created just this year. My previous job was one of the scientists here at MBARI since 1992 with my own research programs (described on other webpages).   My role in this new position is to act as a liaison and ombudsman for other scientists that want to use the Marine Operations resources, such as the ships, ROV's, AUV's and ultimately the MARS cabled observatory. Although such liaison activities were always a part of my previous job as scientist, MBARI decided that once the MARS observatory  becomes operational, there should be one person in this role full time. 
I decided to be the Science Facilitator because it is an opportunity to use all of my experience from over two decades in research, using submersibles, all three major research ROV's and instrumentation such as the seismometers, to support many projects in being successful. 

Toomey.jpg (434886 bytes)Doug Toomey    top of page
Professor Univ. of Oregon  

http://darkwing.uoregon.edu/~drt/

What is your role on this cruise?
Participate in deployment and recovery of ocean bottom seismometers.  Help with analysis of seismic data.  

What are your primary goals?
On this cruise my primary goal is to help others, as needed.  The ocean bottom instrumentation and the ROV are all from MBARI; I will do what those folks tell me to do! As a seismologist I also plan to help with data processing and analysis. 

What do you expect to find?
We all hope to find a very large amount of good seismic data that can be used to characterize the seismicity patterns of the past year.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part is working with others and collecting unique data.  My least favorite part is leaving Emilie and my three children -- Ebba, Sofie and John -- at home. 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?

I am a professor at the University of Oregon.  I have always enjoyed science, challenges and travelling.
This is one job where I can do all three. Mostly through hard work and dedication. 

William Wilcock  top of page
Title: Associate Professor

http://gore.ocean.washington.edu

What is your role on this cruise?
Co Chief-Scientist

What are your primary goals?
To recover the data from the seismometers that are already deployed on the Endeavour and to successfully deploy/redeploy all the seismometers. 

What do you expect to find?
I do not expect to find anything very exciting on this cruise since we are not exploring.  I hope the 8 seismometers we recover all recorded good data. At all the new sites we are visiting we hope/expect to find flat featureless sediments. 

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite - Collecting scientific data and getting back to port Least Favorite - Getting seasick 

What is your job title? Why did you decide to become one? And how did you become one?
I am a university Professor.  My father was an academic and as long as I can remember I have been interested in science and becoming a scientific researcher.  I became interested in marine geology and geophysics during my second year at university and that is when I decided to go to grad school.