Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

Hawaii Cruise
March 13, 2001 to June 2, 2001
Monterey to Hawaii and back
Cruise Participants, Leg 4

Click on any name below to read an interview:
Leg 1 Crew; Leg 2 Crew; Leg 3 Crew; Leg 4 Crew; Leg 5 Crew; Western Flyer Crew

Click on any name to read an interview:
Dave Clague, Lizette Christiansen (John Hopkins University), Brian Cousens (Carlton University)
Jackie Dixon (Univ. of Miami), Ken Hon (University of Hawaii, Hilo), Nancy Jacobsen
Kelsey Jordahl, Jenny Paduan, Jennifer Reynolds (University of Alaska), Ed Seidel (MBA), Cathy Sewell

Dave Clague
MBARI Geologist (Volcanology)
http://www.mbari.org/staff/clague

What is your role on this cruise?
Expedition Coordinator/ Chief Scientist on Legs 2 and 4

What are your primary goals?
Understanding submarine volcanism around Hawaii, subsidence history of the islands, landslide structure.

What do you expect to find?
What types of lavas form what types of volcanic landforms, corals from drowned coral reefs to determine subsidence rates of islands, evidence for explosive submarine eruptions.

What is your favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite part is being able to test ideas and modify the research plan to test new ideas developed from the early results. Least favorite part is being away from my wife and daughter.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one? 
Science is being able to keep asking "why?, how?, when? questions like we asked when we were young-we just ask more sophisticated questions now. I have always wanted to know how the natural world work. I started as an physics major in college, then switched to geology quite late (because of one class and one great professor), went to graduate school in oceanography/earth science. Most important thing to becoming a good ocean scientist is to have broad scientific background and interests. I took nearly a full major in physics and math, lots of chemistry, and some biology as an undergraduate. In graduate school, I was fortunate to work with professors who let me pursue a variety of interests while providing encouragement and guidance.

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Brian Cousens
Carleton University, Ottawa Canada
Adjunct Professor and Research Associate

What is your role on this cruise?
My role is to assist the chief scientists in any way possible.

What are your primary goals?
I want to learn as much as I can about ROV operation and capabilities, especially its ability to sample rocks from the sea floor. I'm also pleased to be able to see the geological setting of the rocks that we collect, since I will be doing radiogenic isotope analyses on some of the samples after the cruise. I also expect to learn a lot in general about volcanism on the sea floor associated with the Hawaiian hotspot.

What do you expect to find?
Lots of cool black rock!

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
I love being at sea. I love the water, the waves, the birds flying over the ship, seeing dolphins if you are lucky, and (hopefully) lots of sunshine! Least favorite is packing up the gear, since that means the cruise is over.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one? 
This sounds really corny, but I was a huge fan of Jacques Cousteau and watched all of his TV specials religiously. So I developed a love of the oceans when I was a teenager. Although I didn't think much about being a scientist at that time, my career choice was practically set. 

How I became one: When I was 14, my parents took us on a four-week, cross-Canada vacation from Montreal to Vancouver, and our week-long stay in Vancouver and Victoria convinced me that this was the place to live. So I planned on going to UBC to study marine biology from that point on. I hit a minor snag in junior college when I discovered that I really didn't like biology much, but I took a geology course that was lots of fun. So I did a B.Sc. in geology at McGill University in Montreal, and then fulfilled my dream by moving to Vancouver and completing a M.Sc. in Marine Geology at UBC. After graduating, I spent three years working in a geochemistry lab at UBC, and then decided that I wanted to go for a Ph.D. After six years in the Pacific Northwest, I wanted a change of scenery, and the University of California at Santa Barbara was the perfect place to go: great scenery, terrific professors, a super bunch of graduate students, and wonderful field trips! After four years, I finished my thesis, packed the car, and moved back to eastern Canada to work first at the Universite de Montreal and, since 1992, at Carleton University. I miss the ocean these days, which is my only regret. My philosophy is to always take advantage of opportunities as they came up - don't put them off, because they may not come up again. Going on this research cruise is an excellent example! 

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Jackie Dixon
University of Miami

What is your role on this cruise?
I am a petrologist and will help collect and describe seafloor basaltic lava and glass samples. Once home, I'll analyze the glasses for dissolved water and carbon dioxide using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. These data will be used to understand the degassing of Hawaiian magmas within the volcano and during eruption.

What are your primary goals?
On a scientific note, I hope to better understand the geochemistry of the deep mantle beneath Hawaii by looking at lavas that erupted on the margins of the big shield volcanoes.

What do you expect to find?
I expect to find basalt, but for me, the real discovery will occur back in the lab.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
I love being at sea. I love being a part of a team that is excited and dedicated to making the cruise a success. I think my favorite part, now that I'm older and a mom, is just getting away from normal routine of juggling multiple responsibilities (teaching, research, cooking, cleaning, moming) and being allowed to completely focus on one task. The worst part, though, is being apart from the family for so long. It is easier now, though, because email at sea allows you to stay in touch.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
I decided to become a geologist because you get to do both sophisticated chemistry (or math or physics) AND be outdoors. Not many other jobs allow you to have your cake and eat it too. 

How did you become one? (Any suggestions for those that want to follow your path?) I had taken some time off from school (Stanford University) as an undergraduate and worked as a scientific navigator on the USGS ship R/V S.P. Lee for 9 months. During that time, I worked with a diverse group of marine geologists. I was on the cruise to the Juan de Fuca Ridge when hydrothermal vents and sulfide deposits were discovered. It was incredibly exciting and I decided that is what I wanted to do for the rest of my career. David Clague and John Delaney were the chief scientists on that cruise. When I went back to school, I asked Dave if I could work for him. He said yes. I completed a master's thesis ('83) with him on Juan de Fuca Ridge samples. We've been collaborating ever since. Later I completed a Ph.D. at Caltech ('92) with Edward Stolper. I'm now an associate professor at the University of Miami.

Be prepared to do something unconventional and not get paid. Study hard. Take lot's of math.


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Jenny Paduan
MBARI Senior Research Technician
http://www.mbari.org/staff/paje

What is your role on this cruise?
I will be assisting with collecting rock and sediment samples with the ROV and over-the-side gear, annotating the video, maintaining the gear, subsampling the samples for analyses, and safely shipping everything home. 

What are your primary goals?
That everything works, that we have everything we will need (kilometers from a hardware store!), and that we get great samples everywhere we look!

What do you expect to find?
LAVA! ...shards of lava glass, pillows and flows of lava, ancient lava, and maybe even some fresh lava (though I don't want to get too close if we should be lucky enough to be the first to see an eruption underwater)!

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite: the excitement of new discoveries
Least favorite: being seasick

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
I have always loved science: What are the plants around me, the animals, rocks, landforms, the stars? What are they made of? How did they get to be the way they are? What makes them function and persist? How are we impacting them? I love the interdisciplinary nature of Oceanography: to understand the ecology of an animal, you must also understand the chemistry, physics, and geology of its habitat. When I was young, I wanted to study volcanoes, then to become an astronomer, then a veterinarian. I was a biochemistry major at a liberal arts college, and went to graduate school to study marine biochemical ecology. Fortunately, along the way I took several geology courses, because my path has taken me full circle back to studying volcanoes!

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nancy1 copy.jpg (12452 bytes) Nancy Jacobsen
MBARI Video Lab Supervisor
http://www.mbari.org/staff/jana

What is your role on this cruise?
I am the supervisor of MBARI's Video Laboratory, where we analyze and archive the biological, geological, and operational content of all MBARI ROV dives. My background is in life science and I will serve as a biologist on this cruise. I will be responsible for annotating the video data and preserving biological specimen collected during the ROV dives. 

What are your primary goals?
My first goal is to ensure that all the significant events during the cruise are archived using MBARI's video annotation program (VICKI). This process includes the capture of frame grabs and post-cruise correlation of video data with physical and chemical data (e.g. CTD-O,lat/long, camera parameters, etc.). My next objective is to advise on the collection of animals and to sort, preserve, and label all specimen collected for MBARI's Sample Archive. Lastly, I hope to assist the rest of the science team as needed.

What do you expect to find?
I expect to find faunal communities that are quite different than those we are familiar with in Monterey Bay. The volcanic cones, vents, and flows we will visit should offer very interesting and uniquely adapted animals.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Most of my exposure to the deep-sea environment has come through watching thousands of hours of video tape. So, my favorite part of a research cruise would have to be seeing the actual biological and geological collections after the ROV is recovered. Being able to make this association a is very important part of solidifying principles of our research. My least favorite part of a research cruise is seasickness.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
Being outdoors has always been an integral part of my life. I have always been fascinated with how animals function, behave with each other and interact with their surroundings. 

I started college as an English major, but quickly realized my life and career should be focused on what I had always known and loved, an appreciation and interest for the living world. I flip-flopped among medicine, marine science and wildlife biology before finally deciding marine science was it. For whichever field is chosen, the key is to gain practical experience as early as possible when there is still plenty of time to change direction. Volunteer, seek internships and jobs, join organizations ... this is the only way to determine if the career will be appropriate and rewarding. 

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Kelsey Jordahl
MBARI Post Doctoral Fellow

What is your role on this cruise?
I will be involved in making the heat flow measurements with the ROV and measuring the thermal properties of sediment cores.

What are your primary goals?
To get good measurements, to learn something new.

What do you expect to find?
Evidence that fluid circulation is affecting the heat flow.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
My favorite part is seeing new and exciting things that we've never seen before. My least favorite is seasickness and isolation.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
It was always what I was interested in, from dinosaurs and astronomy when I was a kid to physics and geophysics in college. I kept going to school, finding the things I was most interested in.

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Jennifer Reynolds
University of Alaska

What is your role on this cruise?
General science operations, especially related to dives on submarine volcanics. 

What are your primary goals?
To learn more about eruptive behavior of the Hawaiian volcanoes, and about Tiburon ROV operations.

What do you expect to find?
Clues to how the islands form.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite: finding new things. Least favorite: being seasick.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
I became a geologist because I liked the combination of field work + lab work + office work (library/computer stuff). Geology is one of those things that becomes more interesting the more you learn about it.

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seidel.jpg (28145 bytes) Edward W. Seidel
Monterey Bay Aquarium Associate Curator

What is your role on this cruise?
Collect and maintain live specimens (as time allows) and assist with data collection.

What are your primary goals?
To collect specimens for display at the Monterey Bay Aquarium's "Mysteries of the Deep."

What do you expect to find?
Mainly deep water invertebrates like sea stars, urchins, corals, crabs, and sponges.

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Favorite: the research cruise itself. Least favorite: all the details/organization needed in preparation for a cruise.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
My grandmother was one of the first female marine biologists at Woods Hole and my mother is a botanist, so I grew up thinking that every kid went tide pooling and worked on their herbarium for summer vacations. Take classes early, follow your passion, and find someone who you are drawn to who works in the field and hang on to them like a limpet!

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Cathy Sewell
Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

What is your role on this cruise?
1. To assist the science team. So far that has meant taking shifts running the program "Vicki" - recording the ROV dives on video and making appropriate annotations - as well as photographing rock samples.
2. I am also on board as an MBARI IS team member working on resolving various IS issues, particularly regarding the satellite e-mail link.
3. Lastly, as an IS person, I have been busy assisting the crew and science staff with various computer issues as they come up.

What are your primary goals?
To be as useful as I can in hopes that I will be invited again; and to learn lots. 

What do you expect to find?
I was unexpectedly invited on this cruise somewhat at the last minute - I had a little more than 48 hours notice prior to departure. I don't think I have had a chance to think upon what I might find out here!

What is your favorite/least favorite part of a research cruise?
Most favorite - it's an adventure! Lots of new things to learn - about the ROV, about the Western Flyer, about the science being conducted - what they are finding and the tools they are using.

Least favorite - so far there has been so much to do, that I have been putting in long days and haven't yet had an opportunity to simply hang out and enjoy being out here.

Why did you decide to become a scientist/engineer/etc? How did you become one?
I became an IS Administrator many years ago when the field was quite new. Like many IS people, I got into IS "through the back door" - when computers were introduced to my workplace, I was the person who "figured them out." Soon it became my entire job. 

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