Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Monterey Bay 2006 field experiments MB2006 Monterey Bay 06 MB06
Press room

Media advisory

 

Researchers & Unmanned Vehicles Study Sea off Monterey Bay, California

Media contacts:
Jennifer Huergo, Office of Naval Research 703-696-0950; HuergoJ@onr.navy.mil
Kim Fulton-Bennett, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 831-775-1835; kfb@mbari.org

What:
Press briefing for Monterey Bay 2006 field experiment

Who:
Researchers and scientists from the Office of Naval Research, Princeton University, the Naval Postgraduate School, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Penn State, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and other institutions will describe their work and demonstrate some of their cutting-edge underwater vehicles and ocean-monitoring tools.

When:
Wednesday, August 23 from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm Pacific Daylight Time.

Where:
Monterey Bay is located about 80 miles south of San Francisco on the coast of Central California. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) is located in Moss Landing California at 7700 Sandholdt Road. Directions available on the MBARI web site: http://www.mbari.org/about/directions/directions.html. Teleconference via phone may also be available if arranged in advance through the media contacts listed above.

About the Monterey Bay 2006 field experiment:
From mid-July to mid-September 2006, almost fifty oceanographers from more than a dozen prestigious research institutions are sending out a fleet of undersea robots and research vessels to study ocean currents and water masses. As part of this wide-ranging experiment, called Monterey Bay 2006 (MB 2006), four different groups of researchers are examining how coastal ocean processes affect the distribution of microscopic organisms, the transfer of heat, and the transmission of sounds and electromagnetic waves within the ocean. The researchers are also using supercomputers to run three state-of-the art computer models, whose daily "ocean weather" forecasts are being compared with and improved using data from undersea gliders, autonomous underwater vehicles, aircraft, satellites, drifters, buoys, and other high-tech instruments. For additional information on this exciting experiment, please see the MB 2006 web page (http://www.mbari.org/mb2006/default.htm).

Site maintained by Michael Godin and Kim Fulton-Bennett

Last updated: Feb. 06, 2009